Tag:
Grip Strength
Art Walge’s Hub Lift

Art Walge’s Hub Lift

We already knew that South Philly’s own Art Walge had a strong set of hands. Here he is upping the ante on the hub lift. It’s a monumental feat to lift a 45 lb. plate by the hub, Art does it with an extra 5 lbs. Art’s also a lefty! No doubt that kind of grip strength...

read more
The Vaughn Automatic Arm Developer

The Vaughn Automatic Arm Developer

Here’s one from way, way, way back in the day. You’d find the Vaughn Automatic Arm developer advertised in STRENGTH magazine and Bernarr MacFadden’s Physical Culture magazine throughout the 1920’s. An interesting concept for sure, you started out with the weight...

read more
York Deep-Dish 45-Pound Barbell Plates

York Deep-Dish 45-Pound Barbell Plates

This is what 45-pound barbell plates looked like way back in the day. If you have some, count yourself lucky, they started disappearing in the 1960’s when The York Barbell Company came out with a more streamlined plate (they could only fit so many of these on a bar...

read more
John Grunn Marx: The Luxembourg Hercules

John Grunn Marx: The Luxembourg Hercules

At an exhibition in Paris, in the year 1905, ‘The Luxembourg Hercules’ John Grunn Marx bent and broke three horseshoes in the span of 2 minutes and 15 seconds. One of these horseshoes is shown above. Marx was descended from a long line of blacksmiths and was famed for...

read more
Samson Champagne’s Rack Pull

Samson Champagne’s Rack Pull

Another rather incredibly feat by Quebec strongman Claude “Samson” Champagne, (who we have featured previously.) Count up all that weight and you’ll arrive at a total of 1369 pounds for a three-inch “rack pull” — or what at one time might have been called a hand and...

read more
The Claw!

The Claw!

The year was 1967 and a mild-mannered and soft-spoken fellow from Nebraska, Jim Raschke, was trying to break into the wrestling business. Like many wrestlers who are starting out, Raschke was still trying to figure out what kind of wrestler he would be… Fortune was...

read more
Jack Shanks Lifts The Dinnie Stones

Jack Shanks Lifts The Dinnie Stones

The year was 1972, and  Jack Shanks, a Belfast policeman, became the first man to lift the Dinnie Stones since Donald Dinnie himself, over a century before. Two important things should be noted about this historic lift: 1) Shanks weighed all of 180 lbs. and 2) Shanks...

read more
George Jowett’s Anvil

George Jowett’s Anvil

"In the old days, anvils were made in various sizes, and in a smithy shop you could always find three or four of different weights. A light anvil would be about seventy-five or eighty pounds and used for straightening nails, or light riveting. The others averaged...

read more
The Ed Block Hand Exerciser

The Ed Block Hand Exerciser

Ed Block was a long-time trainer for the (then) Baltimore Colts football team. In his years of service, he noticed that many of his football players experienced injuries to the fingers, hands, and wrists which prevented them from playing their best. Furthermore, he...

read more
Tag:
Grip Strength
Art Walge’s Hub Lift

Art Walge’s Hub Lift

We already knew that South Philly’s own Art Walge had a strong set of hands. Here he is upping the ante on the hub lift. It’s a monumental feat to lift a 45 lb. plate by the hub, Art does it with an extra 5 lbs. Art’s also a lefty! No doubt that kind of grip strength...

read more
The Vaughn Automatic Arm Developer

The Vaughn Automatic Arm Developer

Here’s one from way, way, way back in the day. You’d find the Vaughn Automatic Arm developer advertised in STRENGTH magazine and Bernarr MacFadden’s Physical Culture magazine throughout the 1920’s. An interesting concept for sure, you started out with the weight...

read more
York Deep-Dish 45-Pound Barbell Plates

York Deep-Dish 45-Pound Barbell Plates

This is what 45-pound barbell plates looked like way back in the day. If you have some, count yourself lucky, they started disappearing in the 1960’s when The York Barbell Company came out with a more streamlined plate (they could only fit so many of these on a bar...

read more
John Grunn Marx: The Luxembourg Hercules

John Grunn Marx: The Luxembourg Hercules

At an exhibition in Paris, in the year 1905, ‘The Luxembourg Hercules’ John Grunn Marx bent and broke three horseshoes in the span of 2 minutes and 15 seconds. One of these horseshoes is shown above. Marx was descended from a long line of blacksmiths and was famed for...

read more
Samson Champagne’s Rack Pull

Samson Champagne’s Rack Pull

Another rather incredibly feat by Quebec strongman Claude “Samson” Champagne, (who we have featured previously.) Count up all that weight and you’ll arrive at a total of 1369 pounds for a three-inch “rack pull” — or what at one time might have been called a hand and...

read more
The Claw!

The Claw!

The year was 1967 and a mild-mannered and soft-spoken fellow from Nebraska, Jim Raschke, was trying to break into the wrestling business. Like many wrestlers who are starting out, Raschke was still trying to figure out what kind of wrestler he would be… Fortune was...

read more
Jack Shanks Lifts The Dinnie Stones

Jack Shanks Lifts The Dinnie Stones

The year was 1972, and  Jack Shanks, a Belfast policeman, became the first man to lift the Dinnie Stones since Donald Dinnie himself, over a century before. Two important things should be noted about this historic lift: 1) Shanks weighed all of 180 lbs. and 2) Shanks...

read more
George Jowett’s Anvil

George Jowett’s Anvil

"In the old days, anvils were made in various sizes, and in a smithy shop you could always find three or four of different weights. A light anvil would be about seventy-five or eighty pounds and used for straightening nails, or light riveting. The others averaged...

read more
The Ed Block Hand Exerciser

The Ed Block Hand Exerciser

Ed Block was a long-time trainer for the (then) Baltimore Colts football team. In his years of service, he noticed that many of his football players experienced injuries to the fingers, hands, and wrists which prevented them from playing their best. Furthermore, he...

read more